Tag archives: Bhasin v. Hrynew

Part 2: Sandbagging in M&A – is silence truly golden?

Last week we provided an overview of sandbagging in M&A transactions and outlined how buyers can mitigate their risk when an anti-sandbagging clause is included in the purchase and sale agreement. In a majority of deals, however, buyers and sellers exclude a sandbagging clause altogether, likely because they are not able to find a mutually agreeable … Continue reading

Seller beware: sandbagging in Canadian private M&A

What is sandbagging? The practice of sandbagging—whereby a purchaser discovers a breach of a representation or warranty on part of the seller during negotiations but nonetheless closes the deal only to then seek indemnification for the breach—continues to plague practitioners in Canadian private M&A. In what is frequently one of the most contentious issues in … Continue reading

Supreme Court recognizes good-faith contractual performance as an organizing principle of common law

In last week’s article, Honesty is the best policy: new common law duty to act honestly in contractual performance, Todd Melchoir considered the Supreme Court of Canada’s recent decision in Bhasin v Hrynew. For further reading on this landmark decision, please check out Norton Rose Fulbright’s bulletin titled Supreme Court recognizes good-faith contractual performance as an organizing … Continue reading

Honesty is the best policy: new common law duty to act honestly in contractual performance

Last week, in its landmark decision in Bhasin v Hrynew, the Supreme Court of Canada (the Court) faced the issue of whether Canadian common law imposes a duty on parties to perform their contractual obligations honestly. In that case, the Court clearly established: (1) a general obligation of good faith in the performance of contracts; … Continue reading
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