Tag archives: Canada Revenue Agency

Non-resident employees: withhold on worldwide income?

ITA regulation 102 requires employers to withhold tax on remuneration paid to non-resident employees who are employed in Canada. This requirement can be avoided by seeking a treaty-based waiver (regulation 102 waiver) or certification as a qualifying non-resident employer. However, often there is not sufficient time to do this before the employment is to begin, or there is a lack of awareness of the rules. Where the employer must withhold tax, should the amount be based on the non-resident employee’s Canadian income or worldwide income? Clarification from the CRA would be appreciated.

Specifically, regulation 102 imposes withholding on “any payment … Continue Reading

Private equity and Canadian partnerships: tax considerations

Canada continues to be an attractive market for private equity (“PE“) investors with recent transactions highlighting significant investments into Canadian real estate and energy infrastructure assets.

Partnerships (particularly, limited partnerships) continue to be a popular PE vehicle, providing a means of pooling and aggregating investment funds and allowing for income or losses to be “flowed-through” to its members for Canadian tax purposes, subject to certain exceptions.

However, the use of partnerships with non-resident investors in PE investments raises two particular issues.

Withholding Tax

Part XIII of the Income Tax Act (Canada) (the “Tax Act“), requires that … Continue Reading

Incoming legislation implements common reporting standards

On July 1, amendments to the Income Tax Act (Canada) implementing international common reporting standards (CRS) will come into force. The CRS regime is intended to facilitate the exchange of taxpayer information between governments. Financial institutions will be required to report financial information about individuals and entities not resident in Canada[1] to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), which will in turn share the information with the tax authorities in the individual or entity’s jurisdiction of residence.

Due diligence obligations

Under CRS, financial institutions in Canada will be required to conduct due diligence on all financial … Continue Reading

Tax considerations for earn-outs and reverse earn-outs

As we have previously noted, earn-outs are becoming an increasingly common part of M&A deals, and there are a number of key commercial questions to consider when negotiating them. But there are also tax consequences that must be considered when structuring earn-outs.

Earn-outs link a portion of total purchase price to the performance of the business following the acquisition. In effect, the purchaser will hold back a portion of the purchase price, and if specified targets are achieved, all or a portion of the held-back purchase price will be paid to the seller. In contrast, a reverse earn-out requires the … Continue Reading

Getting the best (asset) deal: tax efficient purchase price allocations

The number one consideration for anyone buying or selling a business is price. But getting the best price is not just about the total cash value. How the purchase price is allocated across the various assets included in the deal has significant implications for the future tax liabilities of both purchasers and sellers. This article discusses some of the major considerations for purchasers and sellers in deciding how to allocate the purchase price in asset purchase agreements, and recent proposed changes to the tax treatment of goodwill which may alter the current allocation preferences of the purchaser and seller.

Inventory

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Price adjustment clauses in contractual agreements

This article highlights the importance of price adjustment clauses in contractual agreements from a tax perspective.

A price adjustment clause is often used in transactions if property is transferred between non-arm’s length taxpayers and the intention of the parties is for the transaction to occur at fair market value (FMV). If the transaction is later determined by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) to be at something other than at FMV, disastrous tax consequences can result. For example, under the Income Tax Act (Canada), if a taxpayer acquires property from a non-arm’s length person for an amount … Continue Reading

Tax considerations in M&A for purchasers dealing with non-resident vendors

If a non-resident vendor sells property, one consideration that a purchaser must be cognizant of is whether that property constitutes “taxable Canadian property” under the Income Tax Act (Canada). If the property is taxable Canadian property and the vendor does not obtain a certificate of compliance (discussed below), generally the purchaser must withhold 25% of the purchase price and remit it to the Receiver General of Canada.

It should be noted that even a non-resident purchaser is required to make this withholding and remittance. The purpose of these rules is to allow the Government of Canada to secure its tax … Continue Reading

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