Tag archives: intangible asset

Goodwill Hunting: The Value, Protections and Role of Intangible Assets in M&A Transactions

We have previously discussed goodwill as a distinct asset in purchase agreements.  In this post, we explore the growing value of goodwill and other intangible assets in mergers and acquisitions (M&A) and the legal issues parties should consider when seeking to value, protect and exploit these assets.

Intangible assets are often the most significant portion of a target company’s value and goodwill alone can be a very significant portion of a target’s purchase price. For example, in Amazon’s acquisition of Whole Foods, approximately 70% of the purchase price was allocated to goodwill. Although goodwill and intangible assets each … Continue Reading

Know your worth: should you disclose undisclosed intangibles on financial statements?

Intangible assets are the non-monetary, non-physical assets of a business, including its rights, goodwill, overarching brand, and other intellectual property (IP) (i.e., patents, trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets). These types of assets represented 52% of the global enterprise value in 2018; however, 80% of that value went wholly undisclosed on companies’ balance sheets. Why are businesses’ financial disclosures largely silent with respect to intangible assets? Should companies consider reporting on such resources?

Currently, the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), which are commonly followed in Canada, do not allow for businesses to recognize most internally-generated intangible … Continue Reading

Registering and discharging intellectual property security interests

Intellectual property often forms an important part of a target’s assets, especially for start-ups and high-tech companies. It is important for both the purchaser and the vendor to understand the security registration and discharge process in intellectual property assets.

Registration

Pursuant to the provincial Personal Property Security Acts, Intellectual property is considered a type of intangible personal property, and as previously noted in order to perfect a security interest in such intangible property, a secured party must register its security interest at the appropriate personal property security registry in the jurisdiction where the debtor is located .

In addition, a … Continue Reading

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